Call for Submissions: Novella Noir

The editors of Lominy Books are now accepting submissions of novellas for publication in print and e-book format.  We’re interested in noir fiction.

Submission deadline: Rolling. 

Payment: Selected authors will get 20 complimentary copies of the published book.

Submission fee: No submission fee.

Submission Guidelines
• Do not send previously published work.
• Please use our submission manager.
• The novella should be at least 15,000 words and no more than 30,000 words.
• Include a cover sheet with your name, address, telephone, email, the title of your manuscript, and a synopsis of your story. Please do not send your manuscript without a synopsis.
• Manuscripts should be in English and contain no illustrations.
• Manuscripts by multiple authors will not be accepted. Translations will not be accepted.
• Simultaneous submissions are acceptable, but Lominy Books must be notified immediately if the manuscript is accepted for publication elsewhere. Email us at lominybooks@gmail.com. 

What is “Noir”?

Here are definitions you might find useful:

“The simplest definition of noir is fiction that focuses on mostly amoral characters, that typically involves crime or misdeeds, and that evinces a bleak or fatalistic view of the universe. However, noir doesn’t have to be overly depressing or serious; in fact, black humor is often a secondary characteristic. And though noir usually features stripped-down, utilitarian prose, it doesn’t have to; a complex, dense and subtle style can also be used to create stories in this genre.” Álvaro Rodríguez

“In [noir fiction], the protagonist is usually not a detective, but instead either a victim, a suspect, or a perpetrator. He is someone tied directly to the crime, not an outsider called to solve or fix the situation. Other common characteristics of this sub-genre are the emphasis on sexual relationships and the use of sex to advance the plot and the self-destructive qualities of the lead characters. This type of fiction also has the lean, direct writing style and the gritty realism commonly associated with hardboiled fiction.” George Tuttle